Python Escape Sequences


title: Python Escape Sequences

A list of escape sequences can be found here

Escape sequences allow for including special characters into strings.

>>> print('Single quote strings can have \'single\' quotes if they are escaped') "Single quote strings can have 'single' quotes if they are escaped" >>> print("Double quote strings can have \"double\" quotes if they are escaped") 'Double quote strings can have "double" quotes if they are escaped' >>> print("Multiline strings\ncan be created\nusing escape sequences.") Multiline strings can be created using escape sequences. >>> print("Backslashes \\ need to be escaped.") Backslashes \ need to be escaped.

A raw string can be used by prefixing the string with r or R which allows for backslashes to be included without the need to escape them –

>>> print(r"Backslashes \ don't need to be escaped in raw strings.") Backslashes \ don't need to be escaped in raw strings. >>> print(r"An odd number of backslashes at the end of a raw string will cause an error\") File "<stdin>", line 1 print(r"An odd number of backslashes at the end of a raw string will cause an error\") ^ SyntaxError: EOL while scanning string literal.

Some more examples of escape sequences.

Escape Sequence <- Intended Character

  • \\ <- backslash
  • \’ <- single quote / apostrophe
  • \” <- double quote / quotation mark
  • \a <- ASCII bell makes ringing the bell alert sounds ( eg. xterm )
  • \b <- ASCII backspace ( BS ) removes previous character
  • \n <- newline
  • \r <- carriage return

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